Posted on

How To Make The Perfect Ice Tea #4

For every 5 rainy days during British summer, there is a sunny one. We don’t know when it might come but what we do know is that we need to be prepared with a delicious pitcher of iced tea when it does. We want you to get the best out of our tea, so we’ve given you everything you need to know about brewing it cold for those rare summer evenings!

What is Iced Tea?
It’s totally delicious!

What teas should I use?
We recommend fruit infusions such our Peach and Rhubarb (currently 25% off!) or Raspberry Ginger and Vanilla. However lighter black teas such as Darjeeling or Earl Grey also work well.

How many tea bags should I use?
3-4 bags per 400ml water

Should they be brewed hot or cold?
You will get the best flavour out of your iced tea if you brew it hot then pour it over ice.

How long should I brew for?
3 minutes.

How do I make it cold??
Pour it over a jug/glass full of ice or cool in the fridge overnight.

What can I put in it?
Mint, Lemon, Sugar usually work best as a classic topping. If you’ve made a fruity one you can throw in some frozen berries or top it with a bit of Prosecco if you want to spice up your evening.

How long does it last?
It’s best to consume your ice tea within 24 hours. But if you really want to savor the stuff, it can stretch to two days.

Can you recommend any other recipes?

LTC Peach & Rhubarb Iced Tea Recipe
1. Brew 3 to 4 Peach & Rhubarb teabags in 400ml of fresh boiling water for 3 minutes
2. Fill 4 highball glasses with ice and fruit or mint, as preferred
3. Pour the tea over the ice
4. Finish with a straw and garnish with a sprig of mint
5. Et viola!

Darjeeling Iced Tea Recipe

1. Boil up 1.5L fresh water (filtered if poss)
2. Brew 3 Darjeeling tea bags per 700ml for about 5 mins
3. Meanwhile, make up some sugar syrup by heating up 240ml of water and 200g of caster sugar for about 3-5 minutes.
4. Add sugar syrup to the tea with the juice of a lemon.
5. Leave to cool before chilling in the fridge (if you do not leave to cool your tea will be cloudy!)
6. Serve with ice and a sprig of mint or lavender

Camomile & Ginger Iced Tea
http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/chamomile-ginger-iced-tea

Earl Grey Iced Tea
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/sophie-dahls-iced-tea

Posted on

15 Ways To Host A Really Boring Tea Party #2

Tea Party Blog2

15 Ways To Host A Really Boring Tea Party

Are you planning a gathering with a twist? Bored of doing fun things? Are you in need of some inspiration for your annoying sister in law’s baby shower?  Why not host a totally tedious tea party for you and whoever is brave enough to come?

  1. Get out a load of yellow doilies and place them around the house. Have one strategically placed on your table as a conversation starter
  2. Invite some distant relatives
  3. Invite the neighbours that always wants to talk about their pets or the local council
  4. Paint your own teapot and wait to use it
  5. Pop in some dusty, out of date tea bags
  6. Play the classic game, “Guess how long the kettle will take to boil”
  7. Read an excerpt from “The Trumpet of the Swan” or “Roger Red Hat and Billy Blue hat”
  8. Discuss the weather until your tea turns cold
  9. Make sure you drink your tea cold
  10. List your favourite biscuits and in order of crumminess
  11. Get out your carpet and paint samples and ask which kind of beige your guests prefer
  12. Make your guests wait until its dark before they can leave so that you can show them your new curtains
  13. Laugh at your own joke (just the one)
  14. Make paper aeroplanes to pop on the mantel piece
  15. Don’t have any fun

 

 

Posted on

E-tea-quette #1

E-Tea-Quitte Blog2

E-tea-quette #1

Extended little fingers, quaint little china things and frilly tablecloths generally come to mind when one imagines the “proper” way of drinking tea. However, this beloved beverage trickled down from upper classes, through the hands of smugglers into all sections of society in the 18th century. So it has been sipped, glugged and slurped by the masses for years. We have come a long way since then but there still seems to be a set of rules cemented in British Culture that relate back to the 18th century drawing room dweller.

Tea is for everyone. So our question is, how should we drink a cup of tea in 2016? Does the milk come before or after? Is it rude to slurp? Should pinkies be out or in?
As the tea experts who aren’t afraid break the norm, we have broken down the laws of tea drinking for the modern, conscious sipper. Here it goes:

  1. TEA-SPECT

Respect the leaf and the people that grow it. The man hours that go into making the nation’s favourite beverage often go unnoticed, so take the time to find a tea that is Fairtrade or grown where workers are treated fairly. (Psssst. If you’re stuck for options, our entire range is Fairtrade! Click here to find out what this means).

  1. Always offer a cuppa!

There’s no excuse for solo brewing in a social environment. If you don’t offer a cuppa then people will just think you are odd. You only have to say one word: “Tea?” You can even offer without saying anything! You can raise your eyebrows or use a hand gesture (which can also double up as time-out), so be nice and ask whoever is around!

  1. Choose your mug wisely

Some like a good lip. Others like a chunky bucket. Cherish the beverage and find your perfect cup.

  1. Get to grips with your bag

Pyramids and loose tea need around 4 mins to brew, string and tag teabags need about 2-3 for the perfect brew. [Click here to find out which teabag is you should use]

  1. Milk comes AFTER

Technically, the cold milk cools the water and slows the brew.

  1. Stir – Like a Martini.

Get those flavours moving!

  1. Slurp!

Slurping your tea enables oxygen to move the aromas around your taste buds so you can better taste your brew! So if you have ever been told off for slurping, this is the best come back.

  1. Pinkies up or down?

We’re not fussed just don’t drop it and waste your liquid gold.
Want to be a tea expert? Keep an eye for our next tea school blog post!

Why not try out 9 of our best flavours and get yourself a Brew Crew Gift tin. We’re offering free delivery (in the UK) on this baby at the moment so get shopping!

Posted on

Tea-Topia in Darjeeling: A Fairtrade Fairytale

What is Darjeeling? :

Darjeeling is a distinctive delicate black tea. It is exclusive to it’s home which is why it’s sometimes refereed to as “The Dom Perignon of Teas”

Darjeeling lies in the Northern Hemisphere at a very high altitude in the foothills of the Himalayas, so the winter months are extremely cold. During this time, the tea bushes go dormant to conserve their energy. The first flush (“flush” refers to fresh growth),  in Spring is a concentration of all the flavour which has been stored by the tea bush during its winter dormancy. First flush Darjeelings tend to be fresh and light whereas second flush teas have more body and some will demonstrate the typical Darjeeling Muscatel character.

Darjeeling ambootia tea gardens South India
Darjeeling tea gardens at the foothills of the Himalayas

As it it is only picked twice a year, Darjeeling is very sought after.

Our second flush Darjeeling is sultry and sweet and is a lot lighter than a Breakfast or Earl Grey blend, so it can be drunk without milk.

According to @maxfalkowitz from seriouslyeats.com, “discovering delicate, verdant first flush and sultry-sweet second flush Darjeelings is like learning about gin if you only knew about vodka and whiskey.”

Ambootia Tea:

Last week we were lucky enough to meet the producers of our Darjeeling tea: Ambootia Tea.

London Tea team and Ambootia
London Tea team and Ambootia

Just in time for Fairtrade fortnight, when we encourage people to talk openly about ways in which we should feed back into the communities that grow our tea.

The Ambootia tea estate is nestled in the misty Himalayas of Darjeeling, India. It had been around since the 1850’s but after time, a lot of the estates fell sick or were abandoned.

Some years later, Ambootia company came a long and revived the tea gardens which gave back life and livelihood to the surrounding communities. Within a short time of taking over the estate, the land flourished, so did the tea leaves and the hands that picked them. Since then Ambootia has been pioneering the good practice of growing high quality tea.

Ambootia Tea pickers Darjeeling
Ambootia Tea workers picking Darjeeling

Bio-Dynamic goodness

Ambootia encourages and sustains an environmentally friendly culture for their farms. They use natural fertilisers, renewable sources of energy such as hydro electricity and strive for a balanced eco-system which creates good friendly soil for the tea to grow.

Darjeeling tea leaves
Darjeeling tea leaves

Practices for peoples’ well-being: Beyond Fairtrade

The welfare of Ambootia workers is valued as much as the tea. The workers are provided with rent free housing, medical treatment, pension funds.  Free education and vocational training for the youth and support for young children is also among the work done to maintain a high standard of welfare among the workers.

Sports Activities in Ambootia (Fairtrade)
Sports Activities in Ambootia Tea Schools funded by Fairtrade

All money that Ambootia receive from Fairtrade is matched and put into these aspects of the tea community in Darjeeling.

To find out more about the Ambootia tea estates visit:

http://www.ambootia.in/

 

Fairtrade Fortnight: (29th February – 13th March)

As it is Fairtrade Fortnight we want everyone to realise the importance of trading fairly. Keep on top of the discussion with the hashtag #FairtradeFortnight or Instagram your favourite Fairtrade London Tea via @thelondonteacompany.  Most importantly, get involved by incorporating Fairtrade products into your shopping.

Our Darjeeling along with all of our products are all Fairtrade so you have a wide range to choose from!

Shop Darjeeling >

Shop Fairtrade teas >